Webinar: Using Research-Based Solutions for Integrated Management of White Mold in Soybeans

White mold in soybeans

On Wednesday, July 21, the next Pests and Progress webinar will feature Damon Smith, Associate Professor, Field Crops Pathology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Smith will share his research on control options for managing white mold in soybeans. In the past five growing seasons, white mold has caused 36 million bushels of yield loss in the North Central states alone. Smith will discuss use of resistant soybean varieties, modification of row spacing and plant population, crop rotation, biological controls, and fungicide applications—along with recommendations for improving management by combining several of these techniques.

In addition, you will hear about an innovative smartphone prediction tool called Sporecaster, which was developed to help predict white mold infestations. This app is now available for free to help improve mold management in soybeans.

Damon Smith, Associate Professor, Field Crops Pathology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

To learn more, join us on July 21 at 1:30 EDT (12:30 CDT). You must register to receive the link to this free online presentation.

The May Pests and Progress webinar featured Gary Brewer with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Brewer discussed stable fly management, and the recording is available on the North Central IPM YouTube Channel.

Posted in Center News | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Tick App: Your On-the-Go Tick Expert

tick app logo

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Columbia University, and Michigan State University have developed the TickApp, a mobile smartphone application for Android and iOS to help you to learn how to protect yourself, your family and your pets from ticks.

With this app, you join a team of citizen scientists helping researchers better understand ticks and tick-borne disease risks. It’s useful to share your tick data from anywhere in the continental United States, but the current research focus is the Midwest and the Northeast regions, where tick diseases are rapidly increasing.

After an initial five to seven minute survey to gather information about your environment, you will be invited to tell researchers about your daily activities and tick encounters (or lack thereof) during the tick season in the “Daily Log” feature of the app. When you start making logs, you have the option of receiving daily reminders to help you remember to check for ticks.  

tick

When you encounter a tick, the app has a “Report-A-Tick” function so you can share information about where the tick was found, on whom it was found, and what kind of tick you think it is. You also have the ability to send in a photo of the tick to receive an expert opinion on what tick species it is.

The Tick App provides information about how to identify different kinds of ticks, good ways to prevent tick exposure, and facts about ticks and the diseases they transmit. The Tick Activity function also provides information on the local activity level of blacklegged ticks throughout the year.  

The TickApp is available for free for Android via the Google Play and iOS via the App Store. Online access and additional information is available on the app website. Questions about the TickApp can be sent to tickapp@wisc.edu.

Posted in Center News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

New Asian Longhorned Tick Pest Alert Available

Asian longhorned tick
Asian longhorned tick. Photo by James Gathany.

A new Pest Alert from the North Central IPM Center focuses on the Asian longhorned tick, which is native to East Asia. This tick targets livestock and can reproduce even in the absence of male ticks.

“A single individual tick has the potential to establish entire new populations almost anywhere in the US, but if we are vigilant, we may be able to eradicate this tick from new locations,” said Scott Larson, co-leader for the Public Tick IPM Working Group and assistant entomologist for the Metropolitan Mosquito Control District.

The Asian longhorned tick pest alert includes details about the tick’s life cycle, identification, and management options. These ticks are a threat to livestock because large tick infestations on one animal can lead to stress, blood loss and even death. There is also concern that these ticks may be able to spread disease as they feed on multiple hosts throughout their lives.

“We felt this pest alert was needed to increase awareness of the Asian longhorned tick” said Leah McSherry, community IPM coordinator at the IPM Institute of North America, Inc and member of the Public Tick IPM Working Group. “We are optimistic that increased awareness of the Asian longhorned tick will lead to increased management and better control.”

The Tick IPM Working Group formed in 2013 and works to support a network of experts and interested partners that cooperate to reduce tick populations and reduce tick-borne disease risk. More details about this team can be found on the Public Tick IPM Working Group website.

The Public Tick IPM Working Group produced this pest alert with support from the IPM Institute and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Crop Protection and Pest Management Program through the North Central IPM Center (2018-70006-28883).

Pest Alerts are published by the North Central IPM Center as new species arrive in the United States and create new management challenges. They are often written by working groups or by interested researchers or Extension personnel.  A list of Pest Alerts created by the North Central IPM Center and instructions for starting a new one are available here.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

Webinar: Gary Brewer to Present A Push-Pull Strategy to Manage Stable Flies

Gary Brewer profile

On Wednesday, May 19, the next Pests and Progress webinar will feature Gary Brewer, Professor of Insect Pest Management from University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Brewer will share a new, useful push-pull technique for managing stable flies in cattle. It involves the use of a biopesticide with repellent and contact toxicity to stable flies as a push tactic coupled with stable fly traps that are visually and olfactorily attractive as a pull tactic. The technique was effective compared to the untreated control and performed similar to the use of permethrin, which is a standard stable fly treatment. While the technique is likely to benefit other livestock, Brewer’s trials focused on cattle.

To learn more, join us on Wednesday at 1:30 EDT (12:30 CDT). You must register to receive the link to this free online presentation.

The April Pests and Progress webinar featured Rufus Isaacs with Michigan State University and discussed gall wasp outbreak in highbush blueberries. The recording is available on the North Central IPM YouTube Channel.

Posted in Center News | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Webinar: Rufus Isaacs to Present about Gall Wasp in Highbush Blueberries

On Wednesday, April 21, the next Pests and Progress webinar will feature Rufus Isaacs, Professor and Extension Specialist from Michigan State University. Isaacs will discuss the challenge of avoiding insect damage while producing high quality blueberry crops. Diverse IPM practices are useful to protect against insects, such as blueberry maggot, fruitworms and Japanese beetle, but the arrival of spotted-wing Drosophila required alterations to the established IPM practices. More recently, the native blueberry stem gall wasp has become more plentiful and more challenging to manage. Isaacs will discuss the process and progress of finding IPM solutions to blueberry stem gall wasp management. Make plans to join us on Wednesday at 1:30 EDT (12:30 CDT). You must register to receive the link to this free online presentation.

The March Pests and Progress webinar featured Rob Morrison, Research Entomologist

With USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research. The recording is available on the North Central IPM YouTube Channel.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

Virtual Crop Scouting School Now Available from Crop Protection Network

The 2021 Virtual Crop Scout School is now available and is free to the general public. The scout school consists of 22 webinars from crop protection specialists at eleven Midwest Universities and is offered through the Crop Protection Network (CPN).

Crop scouts, farmers, and other users can pick and choose from a variety of diverse subjects to become more knowledgeable on crop scouting. Topics are split into digestible sections so users can focus their time on topics that fit their needs. 

Crop scouting in an important part of integrated pest management (IPM) that helps farmers obtain higher yields and increased profit per acre. Scouting gives farmers and agronomists a “heads-up” about what is happening in the field, allowing preemptive action and appropriate management decisions to be applied.

Scouting crop fields on a regular basis can help to determine emerging crop problems and helps to inform management decisions. Image by Brandon Kleinke.
Scouting crop fields on a regular basis can help to determine emerging crop problems and helps to inform management decisions. Image by Brandon Kleinke.

“The Virtual Crop Scout School is coming on the heels of a web book on crop scouting released by CPN earlier this year,” said Daren Mueller, Extension associate professor at Iowa State University. “Crop scouting can do a lot to bring greater yields to farmers’ fields.”

The CPN has partnered with universities all over the Midwest to make these webinars a reality. This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Crop Protection and Pest Management Program through the North Central IPM Center (2018-70006-28883).

The CPN is a multi-state and international partnership of university and provincial Extension specialists, and public and private professionals that provides unbiased, research-based information. The Network’s goal is to communicate relevant information to farmers and agricultural personnel to help with decisions related to protecting field crops.

Access the Crop Scout School here.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

Honeybear Brands Honored for Collaborative Pest Management Efforts

Honeybear Brands, a company that grows, packages and distributes apples in the Upper Midwest, is being recognized by the International IPM Symposium for work promoting safe, effective, sustainable pest management.

Honeybear Brands has been selected to receive an IPM Team Award for its success in implementing the TruEarth Certification program. Honeybear Brands growers adopted the standards over 10 years ago and have successfully reduced pesticide use, which has also lowered production risks related to pesticide use.

The IPM Team Awards are given to teams that:

  • Collaborate to use IPM to reduce risks (human or animal) from pests
  • Emply teamwork across stakeholder groups, pests, commodities, systems and disciplines
  • Improve economic benefits related to IPM adoption
  • Minimize environmental and natural resources effects

Honeybear Brands deserves this award for setting high standards and then making the changes needed to demonstrate that reducing pesticide use is an attainable goal ,” said Dr. Shakunthala Nair, co-chair of the Awards Committee. “We are pleased to honor Honeybear Brands for leading by example, and we hope to see other companies strive to meet the TruEarth Certification standards.”

As part of the certification program standards, Honeybear Brands growers commit to active pest management efforts, including scouting throughout the season. Thresholds are used to decide when treatment is needed, and high-risk pesticides are avoided. Growers benefit by staying up to date on the latest research. They also receive materials related to risk management as well as information about how to manage apple pests, from rodents to insects to disease.

The careful planning and implementation of the certification standards has allowed Honeybear Brands to lead the industry with increased transparency in pesticide use throughout the supply chain. This transparency makes it possible to use the Pesticide Risk Tool to analyze pesticide risks so high and moderate risks can be reduced. Thus, the practices are reviewed annually, and improvements are made for the following year.

The TruEarth program adopted by Honeybear Brands includes sustainable production practices that even go beyond IPM to include pollinator preservation, soil and water conservation, energy and waste management and grower education.

The International IPM Symposium is organized every three years, and attendees from around the world share their expertise, network with colleagues and learn the latest research and technologies for effectively managing pests.

The theme for 2022 is, “Implementing IPM across Borders and Disciplines,” and the event will be held in March of 2022. 

For a full list of award winners, see the IPM Symposium website.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

Thomas A. Green Receives Lifetime Achievement Honor for Commitment to IPM

Dr. Thomas A. Green from the IPM Institute of North America, Inc, has been selected to receive the Lifetime Achievement award from the International IPM Symposium for promoting Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and sustainability for more than 30 years.

The Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded to individuals who have dedicated their careers to IPM. This award can be achieved by individuals who have:

  • At least 20 years of experience in IPM
  • Enhanced IPM through team building with various stakeholder groups
  • Addressed issues across pests, commodities, systems, and disciplines.

“We are delighted to honor Dr. Green with this prestigious award that recognizes his experience and dedication to IPM,” said Dr. Shakunthala Nair, co-chair of the Awards Committee. “We hope his work inspires others to continue to build on his legacy.”

Green is being honored for his consistent dedication to IPM efforts. Over the years, Green has created four successful startups with goals related to IPM product supply, consulting, risk management and certification and standards development. Green directed the Entomological Foundation from 2009 to 2015 and also served as vice-president and president from 2011 to 2014. He was awarded the Entomological Foundation’s Metal of Honor in 2015. Green earned his Ph.D. in entomology from the University of Massachusetts. Since then, he has written or coauthored over 100 publications and has shared his expertise by presenting at over 250 professional and industry events. Green is a Certified Crop Advisor, an NRCS-Certified Technical Service Provider and has been a member of the Entomological Society since 1983.

In 1998, Green cofounded the IPM Institute of North America with the goal of using the power of the marketplace to increase adoption of IPM and other best practices. As president of the Institute, Green has worked with his team on more than thirty projects to support IPM practices in agriculture, schools, workplaces and homes. Specifically, these efforts help consumers understand food production and pesticide use as well as helping companies to mitigate pesticide-related risks in the supply chain. Green supported the IPM STAR certification for schools and childcare facilities, which includes an on-site evaluation to look for pests and provide pest management advice, if needed. The Institute also offers Green Shield Certification to pest management professionals who want to use sustainable options in their pest management businesses.

Green’s focus on market-based mechanisms to promote IPM led to the creation of Whole Foods Market Responsibly Grown Program, which encouraged updates throughout the supply chain, from agricultural fields all the way to distributers and retailers. While this specific program has ended, many of the practices it promoted continue. Green has also collaborated with Red Tomato on the Northeast Eco Apple Project and with the North Central School IPM Working Group.

The International IPM Symposium is organized every three years, and attendees from around the world share their expertise, network with colleagues and learn the latest research and technologies for effectively managing pests.

The theme for 2022 is, “Implementing IPM across Borders and Disciplines,” and the event will be held in March of 2022. 

For a full list of award winners, see the IPM Symposium website.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

Grower Survey to Assess Herbicide Drift Damage in the North Central United States

Is herbicide drift a problem? Please share your thoughts and experiences with the Herbicide Drift Risk Management Working Group. Your feedback will provide details on the frequency, severity, and economic impact of herbicide drift on specialty crops.

Input is needed from growers of fruits, vegetables, and other specialty crops in the upper Midwest, especially growers who have experienced drift damage, growers who have concerns around this issue, and even growers who have not dealt with drift but who grow sensitive crops in drift-prone regions. Survey responses are expected to help establish herbicide drift as a serious economic and regulatory concern in the North Central United States.

Growers may complete the survey at go.osu.edu/drift44

Who should take this survey? 

The study is for commercial growers of fruits, vegetables, and other specialty crops in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Minnesota, Indiana, Michigan, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Even if you have never experienced herbicide damage, your feedback is important if you grow specialty crops in one of these states. 

Why is this survey necessary? 

Dicamba and 2,4-D drift damage has made headlines in recent years, but no study to-date has attempted to quantify the overall impact drift has on the specialty crop industry. While all states have a way for growers to file a drift complaint, the process and requirements are inconsistent and may involve time and information that a grower does not have. In most states, for instance, the source of the drift must be identified. Research has found that dicamba and 2,4-D both have the potential to travel for miles in specific weather conditions, making source identification difficult.

What good will this survey do? 

This study is designed to assess the potential and actual frequency of drift damage, along with the severity and economic impact of such damage. The survey includes questions on grower awareness, experience, actions, and decisions related to herbicide drift and drift-risk management. The responses will help establish needs for research on drift mechanisms, prevention, and remediation; and/or the need to review current policy and reporting requirements. 

How long will it take? 

The survey takes 5-20 minutes to complete, depending on your experience with drift damage. 

How will this data be shared? 

Summarized survey data will be shared broadly with regulatory agencies, university educators and researchers, agricultural policy makers, grower support organizations, and the general public using news articles, report summaries, and peer-reviewed journal articles. While this study is administered by The Ohio State University, it was planned in partnership with industry experts across the region who will assist with sharing results. Participants may also request a copy of the study summary. 

How will my data be used and protected?

Your privacy is important. No individual survey data will be released or shared beyond the limited group of project staff. The survey questions and procedures have been reviewed by the institutional review board at The Ohio State University and are designed to protect your data and identity. Additional details on privacy and confidentiality are provided at the beginning of the survey. 

How can I learn more? 

The North Central IPM Center’s Herbicide Drift Risk Management Working Group created a series of fact sheets on herbicide drift especially for specialty crop growers. The series includes: Overview of Dicamba and 2,4-D Drift Issues, Frequently Asked Questions, Preparing for Drift Damage, and Responding to Drift Damage. Fact sheets and more information about our special project group and study are available at go.osu.edu/ipm-drift.

This study is facilitated by The Ohio State University and is funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture through agreement 2018-70006-28884. This study is being conducted in cooperation with regional universities and non-profit grower organizations.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment

NCIPMC Webinar Launches Wednesday

Tune in Wednesday for the North Central IPM Center’s first Pests and Progress Webinar featuring Research Entomologist Dr. Rob Morrison from the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research. Morrison will discuss the use of long-lasting insecticide-incorporated netting as an alternative approach to insect control for stored food products. Register now to receive the link to join.

Webinars will be held the third Wednesday of each month at 12:30 pm Central Daylight Time (1:30 pm Eastern), and topics will include updates on the latest research related to IPM.

More details are available on the Pests and Progress Webinar page.

Posted in Center News | Leave a comment