Preparing the North Central region vegetable industries for tackling a new invasive insect pest: the brown marmorated stink bug

When the North Central region of the United States was threatened with a new invasive insect pest for vegetables, the North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (NCIPMC) funded a critical issue project for research in Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota and Indiana. The vegetable industry in that region is valued at approximately $500 million.

The research group’s goal was to detect the brown marmorated stink bug’s (BMSB) first appearance in these states and determine its range in different vegetables and then record damage and monitor population increase.

To conduct this research, the group used black light and pheromone traps in 30 locations in Ohio, five in Minnesota, six in Michigan and 13 in Indiana over a five-month period in 2011. No BMSB were trapped in three states while 166 were trapped in Ohio. The BMSB were trapped throughout the season with 80 caught in July, 30 in August, and 10 each in May, June and September in tomatoes and peppers. No BMSB were caught in sweet corn in this study.

Zsofia Szendrei, associate professor, Department of Entomology at Michigan State University, lead on the project, said one of the most important outcomes of the research was networking and communicating across state lines on the effectiveness of the different types of traps and discussing possible refinements. The USDA is also working on a better lure for the traps.

Results were published on the webpage of the Michigan State vegetable site so producers could track the threshold throughout the growing season. The research group also educated growers on BMSB at vegetable schools plus two reports were published and two state-based scouting workshops were held.

Szendrei said, “Establishing the distribution in the early stages of invasion are critical to understanding the population dynamics. Once populations increase to economically damaging levels, information about cultural and chemical control will be critical to know and disseminate to growers via newsletters and other media outlets.” Perfecting traps and lures will continue to be important.

She also noted that although the number of BMSB trapped were fairly low, it was important to determine the distribution of this invasive species in the North Central vegetable production areas. BMSB have no natural enemies or controls.

It’s important to properly identify the BMSB as opposed to beneficial native stink bugs. BMSB has white band on their antennae and alternating black and white bands along the abdomen with a little red mixed in.

This project also leveraged other funding from the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program through the Minnesota Department of Agriculture from 2012-2013 for $79,295.00; Title: “Preparing Minnesota fruit and vegetable growers for the management of a new pest, the brown marmorated stink bug.”

Posted in Center News, Insect Management, Vegetable IPM | Tagged | Leave a comment

Researching What Could be Tomorrow’s Problem Corn Ear Pest

Débora Montezano-UNL Graduate Research Assistant
Thomas Hunt – Extension Entomologist
Julie Peterson – Extension Entomologist
José Paulo F. Bentivenha-Post Doctoral Student at the University of Sao Paulo

Nebraska-Brazil Collaboration Studies New and Old Corn Insect Pests
US farmers may not be very familiar with the Old World bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). This species is native to Asia, Europe, Africa, and Australasia where it is a significant agricultural pest, causing billions of US dollars in damages annually due to yield losses and insecticide application. The Old World bollworm, which feeds on corn ears, is now causing damage to crops in the Western Hemisphere.

For the last five years the species has been a problem for Brazilian crops, adding to the economic damage already caused by other noctuids such as the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea). Unfortunately, this pest has impressive migratory abilities and has been increasing its range since its first detection in Brazil. While Old World bollworm moths have now been found on the western coast of Florida, the pest has not become established yet in North America.

With the introduction of this pest looming for North America, it is important to understand how it might affect US crop production. One factor affecting its status will be how it interacts with pests already established in the United States. Pest species that rely on the same food source (corn ears) will be in competition with each other and may engage in predation or cannibalism. From a bioecological standpoint Old World bollworm is similar to several pests already active in US corn, including the corn earworm and fall armyworm, both of which present cannibalistic and predatory behavior. In Brazil, these species are already cohabiting in diverse agricultural crops, as well as sharing the same feeding site.

Therefore researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in partnership with two Brazilian researchers, Edson Luis Baldin from the São Paulo State University and Silvana V. de Paula Moraes (EMBRAPA), today at the University of Florida, are investigating interactions of the main corn ear-feeding pests in South and North America (Figures 1-4).

Laboratory research on corn ear pests
Figure 1. Corn earworm and fall armyworm in laboratory studies to evaluate behavior patterns in the presence and absence of food.
Laboratory research on corn ear pests
Figure 3. Interaction among species on corn under field conditions to evaluate cannibalism/predation rates.
Laboratory research on corn ear pests
Figure 2. Researchers are studying the interaction among species on non-Bt corn ears to determine the larval survival.
Laboratory research on corn ear pests
Figure 4. Fall armyworm and corn earworm on non-Bt corn.
The introduction of the Old World bollworm in Brazil (probably in 2008, with identification in 2012-13) led to a drastic change in pest management in crops such as corn, soybean, and cotton. As the Old World bollworm becomes prevalent in Western hemisphere crops, it can be assumed that existing pest populations may change their population dynamics. When this occurs, the tools used to manage agricultural pests (integrated pest management and insect resistance management) will need to be improved. It is our responsibility to better understand these interactions to properly manage these economically disruptive species in crops.

So far, the collaborations between Nebraska and Brazil have resulted in nine research publications. Four of the most recent are summarized below.

1. Battle in the New World: Helicoverpa armigera versus Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). J.P.F. Bentivenha, J.P., S.V. Paula-Moraes, E.L.L. Baldin, A. Specht, I.F. da Silva and T.E. Hunt. 2016. PloS one, 11(12), e0167182.

Interaction studies between the species were evaluated in interspecific and intraspecific scenarios under laboratory and field conditions. Both species exhibit high cannibalism/predation rates, and larval size was the primary factor for larval survival in the interaction studies. Corn earworm has an advantage in intraguild interactions with Old World bollworm in corn. Overall, the results from this study indicate that corn might play a role as a source of infestation.

2. Intraguild interactions and behavior of Spodoptera frugiperda and Helicoverpa spp. on maize. J.P.F. Bentivenha, D.G., Montezano, T.E., Hunt, E.L.L. Baldin, J.A. Peterson, V.S. Victor and S.V. Paula-Moraes. 2017. Pest Management Science.

The intraguild interactions of these species were assessed by determining the survival of larvae in interaction scenarios with non-Bt corn silks and ears. This study provides significant information regarding noctuid behavior and larval survival during intraguild interactions, which may impact pest prevalence and population dynamics, thereby affecting integrated pest management and insect resistance management of these species in corn.

3. Attack and defense movements involved in the interaction of Spodoptera frugiperda and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). J.P.F. Bentivenha, E.L.L. Baldin, D.G. Montezano, T.E. Hunt and S.V. Paula-Moraes. 2017. Journal of Pest Science 90(2), 433-445.

Interaction scenarios were assessed in arenas in the presence and absence of food. Corn earworm shows higher aggressive movements. However, fall armyworm takes more advantage during the interactions. This study provides relevant information regarding the interaction during intraguild interaction, which might influence the population dynamics and the competitive displacement of pest species sharing the same food source.

4. Intraguild competition of three noctuid maize pests. J.P.F. Bentivenha, E.L.L. Baldin, T.E. Hunt, S.V. Paula-Moraes and E.E. Blankenship. 2016. Environmental Entomology 45(4), 999-1008.

Western bean cutworm (WBC), fall armyworm and corn earworm were exposed to competition scenarios with corn silk or ears. Survival of WBC was significantly lower. For fall armyworm, survival remained high in the different competition scenarios and corn earworm had a high rate of cannibalism and higher survival when competing against WBC. The absence of a competitor for the feeding source may confer an advantage to the larval development of fall armyworm and corn earworm.

Related publications include:

Plant-to-plant movement of Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Maize. L.E.R. Pannuti, S.V. Paula-Moraes, T.E. Hunt, E.L.L. Baldin, L. Dana and J.V. Malaquias. 2016. Journal of Economic Entomology. 2016, 1-7.
On-Plant Larval Movement and Feeding Behavior of Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on Reproductive Corn Stages. L.E.R. Pannuti, E.L.L. Baldin, T. E. Hunt and S. V. Paula-Moraes. 2015. Environmental Entomology. 2015, 1–9.
Western bean cutworm survival and the development of economic injury levels and economic thresholds in field corn. S.V. Paula-Moraes, T.E. Hunt, R.J. Wright, G.L. Hein and E.E. Blankenship. 2013. Journal of Economic Entomology. 106(3): 1274-1285.
On-Plant Movement and Feeding of Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Early Instars on Corn. Environmental Entomology. S.V. Paula-Moraes, T.E. Hunt, R.J. Wright, G.L. Hein, and E.E. Blankenship. 2012. 41(6): 1494-1500.
Cost-effective binomial sequential sampling of western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), egg masses in corn. S.V. Paula-Moraes, E.C. Burkness, T.E. Hunt, R.J. Wright, G.L. Hein, W.D. Hutchison. 2011. Journal of Economic Entomology. 104(6):1900-1908.

http://cropwatch.unl.edu/2017/researching-what-could-be-tomorrows-corn-ear-pest

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USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Seeks Stakeholder Input on Food, Agriculture Priorities  

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture announces its stakeholder listening initiative “NIFA Listens: Investing in Science to Transform Lives.” This stakeholder listening opportunity informs the research, extension and education priorities of NIFA, which has the mission of investing in and advancing agricultural research, education and extension to solve societal challenges. These investments in transformative science directly support the long-term prosperity and global pre-eminence of U.S. agriculture. This listening opportunity allows stakeholders to provide feedback on the following questions: “What is your top priority in food and agricultural research, extension or education that NIFA should address?” and “What are the most promising science opportunities for advancement of food and agricultural sciences?”

This effort to obtain input on NIFA’s science priorities will be carried out through online and in-person submission mechanisms. Stakeholder input received from the two mechanisms is treated equally. The priorities and opportunities obtained from this effort will be evaluated in conjunction with input from NIFA staff. This information will be critical for NIFA’s evaluation of existing science emphasis areas to identify investment opportunities and gaps in the current portfolio of programs. The information obtained through this iterative analysis and synthesis will help to ensure the strategic positioning and relevancy of NIFA’s investments in advancing agricultural research, education and extension.

DATES:

(A) Online Input: Submission of online stakeholder input to the target questions will be open upon publishing of this Notice through 5 p.m. Eastern time December 1, 2017.

(B) In-person Listening Sessions: Four listening sessions, each a full day, will be organized throughout the United States to obtain input from all stakeholders, including small institutions, local business and other stakeholder groups. The listening sessions will take place on October 19, 2017, October 26, 2017, November 2, 2017 and November 8, 2017. Each session will begin at 8:30 a.m. and is scheduled to end by 5:00 p.m. local time. Each session will include a presentation of the goals and background information on NIFA programs, followed by comments from stakeholders. Each registered speaker will receive 5 minutes to share their comments with the Agency. If time allows after all comments from registered speakers are made, unscheduled speakers will be allowed 5 minutes to present their comments to the Agency. The length of the sessions will be adjusted according to numbers of participants seeking to provide input. All parties interested in attending an in-person listening session must RSVP no later than October 12, 2017. These sessions will be webcast and transcribed. Information about registering for the in-person session, providing written comments and viewing the webcast can be found at https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens.

Registration: The Web site, https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens, includes instructions on submitting written comments and registering to attend or speak at the in-person listening sessions. All parties interested in attending an in-person listening session must RSVP no later than October 12, 2017. The number of attendees and oral commenters is limited due to time and space constraints (see below). Oral commenter slots will be allotted on a first-come, first-served basis. All interested stakeholders, regardless of attendance, are welcome to submit written comments.

Comments: Written comments are due by December 1, 2017. Written comments must be submitted electronically through https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens or emailed to NIFAlistens@nifa.usda.gov.

ADDRESSES:

The in-person listening sessions will take place at conference facilities in Kansas City, MO (October 19, 2017), Atlanta, GA (October 26, 2017), Sacramento, CA (November 2, 2017), and Hyattsville, MD (November 8, 2017).

All parties interested in attending an in-person listening session must RSVP no later than October 12, 2017.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Megan Haidet, Program Specialist, NIFA, at 202-401-6617, email NIFAlistens@nifa.usda.gov, or visit https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens for detailed information about providing written comments, joining the in-person sessions remotely, or registering to speak at an in-person session.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

The science priority-setting process at NIFA involves soliciting stakeholder input on agricultural research, education and extension needs, obtaining input from NIFA’s science staff who are informed through interactions with scientific communities, and evaluating existing programs to identify critical gaps in the current portfolio of programs in order to address challenges in U.S. agriculture.

This listening effort will focus on answers to the following questions, “What is your top priority in food and agricultural research, extension or education that NIFA should address?” and “What are the most promising science opportunities for advancement of food and agricultural sciences?”

NIFA welcomes stakeholder input from any group or individual interested in agricultural research, extension or education priorities for NIFA. NIFA is eager to listen to stakeholder’s comments on the priorities, solutions and opportunities that will facilitate long-term sustainable agricultural production, research, education and extension. This listening effort will focus on the agricultural science that NIFA invests in, but not on NIFA processes or procedures.

All parties interested in attending an in-person listening session must RSVP no later than October 12, 2017. Start Printed Page 43326Abstracts from in-person speakers can be submitted upon registration via https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens.

Written comments by all interested stakeholders are welcomed through 5 p.m. Eastern time, December 1, 2017. All input will become a part of the official record and available on the NIFA Web site, https://nifa.usda.gov/​nifalistens.

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Funding Opportunity: Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program

Document Type: Grants Notice 
Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-CFP-006392
Funding Opportunity Title: Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program
Opportunity Category: Mandatory
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Agriculture
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
CFDA Number(s): 10.225 — Community Food Projects
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes
Version: Synopsis 1
Posted Date: Sep 12, 2017
Last Updated Date: Sep 12, 2017
Original Closing Date for Applications: Dec 04, 2017
Current Closing Date for Applications: Dec 04, 2017
Archive Date: Jan 03, 2018
Estimated Total Program Funding: $8,640,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:
Eligibility
Eligible Applicants: Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Public food program service providers, tribal organizations, or private nonprofit entities, including gleaners (see Definition in Part VIII, E.). Please refer to Part III, Eligibility in the RFA.
Additional Information
Agency Name: National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Description: In FY 2018, NIFA’s CFP intends to solicit applications and fund two types of grants. The types are entitled (1) Community Food Projects (CFP) and (2) Planning Projects (PP). The primary goals of the CFP are to: Meet the food needs of low-income individuals through food distribution, community outreach to assist in participation in Federally assisted nutrition programs, or improving access to food as part of a comprehensive service; Increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for the food needs of the communities; Promote comprehensive responses to local food access, farm, and nutrition issues; and Meet specific state, local or neighborhood food and agricultural needs including needs relating to: Equipment necessary for the efficient operation of a project; Planning for long-term solutions; or The creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers.
Link to Additional Information: Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program
Grantor Contact Information: If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:

NIFA Help Desk Phone: 202-401-5048 Business hours are M-F, 7:00 am -5:00 pm ET, excluding Federal holidays.

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Video about Bt crops, resistance and management released

The link to the full-length video is here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJtaDeaOp0I&feature=youtu.be

Link to a shorter version for Twitter/Facebook etc., is here:

https://twitter.com/PurdueExtension

This link will allow anyone to download the shorter video for Twitter and other social media needs:

https://filelocker.purdue.edu/public_download?shareId=b98970515e37e29b1e603f8f2fbfe9ec

The goal for this product is that this be relevant and useful for growers, consultants, and anybody else who wants to know about Bt crops and resistance. There does not seem to be a similar video on Youtube that covers this ground, so hopefully this will fill a niche and provide some useful information and be a starting point for a discussion that will continue as Bt crop challenges mount.

The committee who developed the video consisted of:

Chris Difonzo, Michigan State University

Christian Krupke, Purdue University

Jocelyn Smith, Ridgetown campus, University of Guelph

Joseph Spencer, Illinois Natural History Survey

Special thanks also to the following industry partners, who provided input and reviews on the script and participated in our phone meetings from start to finish:

Miles Lepping, Dow Agrosciences

Clint Pilcher, DuPont-Pioneer

Dwain Rule, Dow Agrosciences

Funding was provided through the North Central Regional Association (NCRA) with a $2k contribution from each of the following member universities:

Michigan State

Purdue

Ohio State

University of Illinois

University of Nebraska

 

 

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NCR-SARE Announces 2017 Research & Education, Graduate Student, and Professional Development Awards

The North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (NCR-SARE) Program is pleased to announce the projects recommended for funding for the Research and Education, Graduate Student, and Professional Development competitive grant programs. 37 projects were awarded a total of more than $3 million through these three NCR-SARE grant programs, which offer competitive grants for researchers, graduate students, organizations, agricultural educators, and others who are exploring sustainable agriculture in America’s Midwest.

For the 2017 Research and Education program, NCR-SARE awarded $2.2 million to 12 projects ranging from $120,000 to $199.944. The Research and Education Program is a competitive grant program for researchers and educators involved in projects that explore and promote environmentally sound, profitable, and socially responsible food and/or fiber systems. The following awarded projects are in order by state:
• Wenjing Guan at Purdue University in Vincennes, IN was awarded $200,000 for the project, “Improving Seedless Cucumber Production to Diversify High Tunnel Crops in the North Central Region.”
• Tamara Benjamin at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN was awarded $194,663 for the project, “Organic Transition and Certification: Supporting Indiana Grain Farmers’ Capacity to Meet Market Demand.”
• Matt Raven at Michigan State University in Lansing, MI was awarded $151,408 for the project, “Land-Based Learning Centers: A Multi-generational Educational Approach to Promoting On-farm Sustainable Agriculture.”
• Nicolas Jelinski at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $198,529 for the project, “Collaborative Evaluation of Ecosystem Services Provided by Urban Agricultural Best Management Practices in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area.”
• Greg Schweser at the University of Minnesota Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $196,423 for the project, “Deep Winter Food Production in the North Central Region.”
• M. Scott Wells at the University of Minnesota in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $199,999 for the project, “Winter Camelina: New Cash Crop Opportunities for Sustainable Sugar Beet Production.”
• Allison Meyer at University of Missouri in Columbia, MO was awarded $199,732 for the project, “Characterization of Winter Forage Management in North Central Region Beef Cow-calf Operations.”
• Kathie Starkweather at tbe Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons, NE was awarded $200,000 for the project, “Honey Bees on the Farm: Connecting Women Beekeepers and Farmers for Environmental and Economic Benefit.”
• Sally Miller at The Ohio State University in Wooster, OH was awarded $149,349 for the project, “Optimizing Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation to Manage Emerging Soilborne Diseases in Tomato Protected Culture Systems in the North Central Region.”
• Chris Blanchard at Purple Pitchfork in Madison, WI was awarded $96,949 for the project, “Increasing Market-Farm Enterprise Resilience in Response to Significant Weather Events, Life Events and Other Threats to Livelihood: A Collaborative Response to Known Quality of Life Concerns.”
• Julie Dawson at The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System in Madison, WI was awarded $199,915 for the project, “Improving Farmer Options for Sustainable and Profitable Direct-market Tomato Production and Hoop House Management in the Upper Midwest.”
• Walter Goldstein at Mandaamin Institute in Elkhorn, WI was awarded $196,088 for the project, “Testing N Efficient, High Methionine Corn Hybrids with Organic Farmers.”
For the 2017 Graduate Student program, NCR-SARE awarded more than $214,000 to 18 projects ranging from $11,154 to $12,000. Graduate Student Grant program is a competitive grant program to fund graduate student projects that address sustainable agriculture issues. The following awarded projects are in order by state:
• Moriah Bilenky along with Professor Ajay Nair at Iowa State University in Ames, IA was awarded $11,977 for the project, “Integration of Poultry and Cover Crops for Soil Health in Vegetable Production.”
• Scott Clem along with Professor Alexandra Harmon-Threatt at the University of Illinois in Urbana, IL was awarded $11,993 for the project, “Understanding Aphidophagous Hoverfly Winter Survival Strategies in Midwest Farmscapes to Improve Conservation Biological Control.”
• Nithin Jayaram Shetty along with Professor Krishna S.V. Jagadish at Kansas State University in Manhattan, KS was awarded $11,984 for the project, “Unlocking Wild Wheat Potential for Enhancing Water use Efficiency and to Sustain Yield Gains under Extreme Water-deficit and Heat Stress.”
• Stephen Morgan along with Professor Nicole Mason at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI was awarded $11,970 for the project, “Measuring Farmer Response to the Rate of Agricultural Innovation: Experimental Evidence from Michigan.”
• Alyssa Tarrant along with Professor Zachary Hayden at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI was awarded $12,000 for the project, “Optimizing Between-bed Management Strategies in Plasticulture Vegetables for Improved Crop Production and Soil Health.”
• Emily Anderson along with Professor Satoshi Ishii at the University of Minnesota in St Paul, MN was awarded $11,929 for the project, “Enhancing Edge-of-field Woodchip Bioreactors to Reduce Nitrogen Leaching using Bioaugmentation and Biostimulation.”
• Eric Nazareno along with Professor Shahryar Kianian at the University of Minnesota in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $11,999 for the project, “Identification and Pyramiding of Candidate Genes Controlling Adult Plant Resistance in Oats Against Crown Rust Disease.”
• Becky Zhong along with Professor Kevin Smith at the University of Minnesota in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $11,986 for the project, “Assessing Agroecosystem Services and End-use Malting Quality of Winter Barley in a Soybean-winter Barley Double Cropping System in the Upper Midwest.”
• Justin Keay along with Professor Jaime Pinero at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, MO was awarded $11,703 for the project, “Evaluation of Early Maturing Cereal Rye / Hairy-vetch Cover Crop Varieties and their Effects on Subsequent Cash Crop Planting Date, Maturity and Yield in Organic No-till Summer Squash Production.”
• Michael Patterson along with Professor Xi Xiong at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO was awarded $11,154 for the project, “Developing an Innovative Approach for Control of Billbug on Sod Farms.”
• Allison Butterfield along with Professor Samuel Wortman at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln in Lincoln, NE was awarded $11,990 for the project, “Integrating Weed and Nutrient Management in Hop (Humulus lupulus) Production using Organic Amendments.”
• Mary Lenz along with Professor Mary Drewnoski at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln in Lincoln, NE was awarded $11,947 for the project, “Evaluating Nitrate Toxicity Potential in Grazed Cover Crops.”
• Mitchell (Ben) Samuelson along with Professor Samuel Wortman at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln in Lincoln, NE was awarded $11,993 for the project, “Assessing Microbial Communities of Aqueous Compost Extracts and their Effects on Mulch and Crop Residue Degradation.”
• Denisha Parker along with Professor Mary Gardiner at The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH was awarded $11,924 for the project, “Lady Beetle in the City: Does Diet Overlap Explain Patterns of Native Lady Beetle Abundance in Urban Farms and Greenspaces?”
• Adrian Pekarcik along with Professor Kelley Tilmon at The Ohio State University in Wooster, OH was awarded $11,995 for the project, “Entomopathogenic Nematode Control of the Asiatic Garden Beetle (Maladera castanea) in Corn.”
• Jacob Henden along with Professor Christelle Guédot at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, WI was awarded $11,919 for the project, “Effect of Landscape on Migration of Japanese Beetle into Vineyards across Southern Wisconsin.”
• Elizabeth McNamee along with Professor Christopher Kucharik at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, WI was awarded $11,882 for the project, “Understanding Irrigation Technologies and Grower Decision-making in the Wisconsin Central Sands.”
• Greg Richardson along with Professor Matt Ruark at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, WI was awarded $11,906 for the project, “The Effect of Best Management Practices on Soil Health in Wisconsin: A Comparison of Soil Biological Measurements Using Long-Term Trials.”
For the 2017 Professional Development Program, NCR-SARE awarded more than $517,000 to seven projects ranging from $68,970 to $75,000. NCR-SARE Professional Development Program competitive grants emphasize training agricultural educators in extension, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, private, and not-for-profit sectors, using farmers as educators and addressing emerging issues in the farm community. The following awarded projects are in order by state:
• Ajay Nair with Iowa State University in Ames, IA was awarded $74,994 for the project, “Training Extension Educators and Local Food Professionals on Sustainable Vegetable Pest Management Tools and Techniques.”
• Eileen Kladivko with Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN was awarded $74,680 for the project, “Midwest Cover Crops Council – Cover Crop Decision Tool.”
• Theresa Keaveny with the Sustainable Farming Association (SFA) in New Ulm, MN was awarded $75,000 for the project, “SFA Networking for Soil Health.”
• Rebecca Masterman with the University of Minnesota Bee Squad in Saint Paul, MN was awarded $75,000 for the project, “Training an Influential Network of Farming, Beekeeping and Extension Experts to Promote Bee Health.”
• Jill Hapner with GrassWorks, Inc. in West Bend, WI was awarded $74,610 for the project, “Promoting Grazing as a Sustainable Farming Method to Agency Staff in Wisconsin.”
• Laura Paine with Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship in Columbus, WI was awarded $74,107 for the project, “Enhancing the Quality of Work-based Beginning Farmer Training Programs Through Trainer Professional Development.” Paine’s project has been named as the 2017 Paula Ford Professional Development Program Proposal of the Year. From 1991-1997 Dr. Ford served as the Program Coordinator for the Southern Region SARE program. She was the NCR-SARE Professional Development Program Coordinator at Kansas State University for 11 years (1999-2009), and supported sustainable agriculture and SARE for more than 20 years. To honor Dr. Ford’s contributions to NCR-SARE, the Administrative Council created the “Paula Ford Professional Development Program Proposal of the Year” award. Each year, one Professional Development Program funded project in the North Central region is given this special designation. The region selects the project that best exemplifies Dr. Ford’s contributions and passion for evaluation, professional development and/or science-based research.
• Luther Smith with the American Society of Agronomy in Madison, WI was awarded $68,970 for the project, “Sustainable Agronomy.”
View NCR-SARE’s 2017 funded projects along with their descriptions—including the Farmer Rancher, Youth Educator, and Partnership grants that were awarded earlier this year—online at http://www.northcentralsare.org/Grants/Recent-Grant-Projects

NCR-SARE’s Administrative Council (AC) members decide which projects will receive SARE funds. A collection of farm and non-farm citizens, the AC includes a diverse mix of agricultural stakeholders in the region. Council members hail from regional farms and ranches, the Cooperative Extension Service, universities, federal agencies, and nonprofit organizations.

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Call for posters for the 9th International IPM Symposium

Online Submission of Poster Abstracts Is Now Open

Use this opportunity to share your integrated pest management (IPM) work. Submit a poster for the 9th International IPM Symposium that will be held March 19–22, 2018, in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Poster abstracts should be submitted online at https://ipmsymposium.org/2018/posters.html between now and Nov. 13, 2017 for full consideration. The abstract must contain an accurate summary of the work and be clear and concise. Instructions for abstract submissions can be found on the Poster web site.

Posters will be organized by division: Fruit, Nut and Orchard Crops; Rangeland, Livestock, and Pastures; Field Crops; Specialty Crops (Nursery, Greenhouse, Hydroponic, Landscape, Turf and Sod); Medical, Veterinary and Urban; Vegetable Crops; Other (Wildland and Natural Landscapes, Forestry, etc.); Cross-disciplinary (involving or relevant to two or more environments).

New this year is the Student Poster Awards category. Student project poster submissions will be entered into the IPM Inspiration Award competition.

Contact Michelle Marquart, Symposium Coordinator, at mmarqua2@illinois.edu to learn more about attending, exhibiting at or contributing to the Symposium..
https://ipmsymposium.org/2018/index.html

Please share with your colleagues.

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Assessing the value and pest management window provided by neonicotinoid seed treatments…

Available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ps.4602/epdf

Assessing the value and pest management window provided by neonicotinoid seed

treatments for management of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) in the Upper Midwestern United States
by Christian H Krupke,Adam M Alford, Eileen M Cullen, Erin W Hodgson,

Janet J Knodel, Brian McCornack, Bruce D Potter, Madeline I Spigler,

Kelley Tilmon and Kelton Welch

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A 2-year, multi-state study was conduc ted to assess the benefits of using soybean seed treated with the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam to manage soybean aphid in the upper Midwestern USA and compare this approach with an integrated pest management (IPM) approach that included monitoring soybean aphids and treating with foliar-applied insecticide only when the economic threshold was reached. Concentrations of thiamethoxam in soybean foliage were also quantified throughout the growing season to estimate the pest management window afforded by insecticidal seed treatments.

RESULTS: Both the IPM treatment and thiamethoxam-treated seed resulted in significant reductions in cumulative aphid days when soybean aphid populations reached threshold levels. However, only the IPM treatment resulted in significant yield increases. Analysis of soybean foliage from thiamethoxam-treated seeds indicated that tissue concentrations of thiamethoxam were statistically similar to plants grown from untreated seeds beginning at the V2 growth stage, indicating that the period of pest suppression for soybean aphid is likely to be relatively short.
CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that an IPM approach, combining scouting and foliar-applied insecticide where necessary, remains the best option for treatment of soybean aphids, both in terms of protecting the yield potential of the crop and of break-even probability for producers. Furthermore, we found that thiamethoxam concentrations in foliage are unlikely to effectively manage soybean aphids for most of the pests’ activity period across the region.

Posted in Agricultural IPM, Field Crop IPM, General Information, Insect Management, IPM Arenas, Pollinators | Leave a comment

Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship (NNF) Grants Program announced

This grant program supports: (1) training students for master’s and doctoral degrees in food, agricultural and natural resource sciences; and (2) Special International Study or Thesis/Dissertation Research Travel Allowances (IRTA) for eligible USDA NNF beneficiaries. Awards are specifically intended to support traineeship programs that engage outstanding students to pursue and complete their degrees in USDA mission areas. Applicants provide clarity about the philosophy of their graduate training, and relevance to USDA mission sciences, NIFA priorities and national science education policies and statistics. Applications are being solicited from institutions that confer a graduate degree in at least one of the following Targeted Expertise Shortage Areas: 1) animal and plant production; 2) forest resources; 3) agricultural educators and communicators; 4) agricultural management and economics; 5) food science and human nutrition; 6) sciences for agricultural biosecurity; and 7) training in integrative biosciences for sustainable food and agricultural systems.

Who is eligible to apply:
1862 Land-Grant Institutions, 1890 Land-Grant Institutions, 1994 Land-Grant Institutions, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Other or Additional Information (See below), Private Institutions of Higher Ed, State Controlled Institutions of Higher Ed

More Information on Eligibility:
Applications may be submitted by: 1) Land-Grant Institutions, 2) colleges & universities having significant minority enrollments & a demonstrable capacity to carry out the teaching of food & agricultural sciences, & 3) other colleges & universities having a demonstrable capacity to carry out the teaching of food & agricultural sciences. Applications also may be submitted by research foundations maintained by eligible colleges or universities.
Request for Applications
Apply for Grant
Closing Date: Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017
Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-HEP-006390
Estimated Total Program Funding: $3,100,000

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University of Illinois seeks post doc to study the behavioral ecology of host preference in Aedes albopictus.

A post-doc opportunity with Chris Stone at the University of Illinois to study the behavioral ecology of host preference in Aedes albopictus

 

Please see https://publish.illinois.edu/medentlab/joining-the-lab/ for details.

 

If you know someone who may be interested, please contact cstone@illinois.edu.

Posted in Job Opportunities | Leave a comment