Category Archives: Pollinators

Assessing the value and pest management window provided by neonicotinoid seed treatments…

Available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ps.4602/epdf Assessing the value and pest management window provided by neonicotinoid seed treatments for management of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) in the Upper Midwestern United States by Christian H Krupke,Adam M Alford, Eileen M Cullen, Erin W … Continue reading

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USDA pollinator study examines forage quality

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg In Delta Farm Press USDA’s Economic Research Service conducted a literature review of the effects of land use on pollinator health and examined the trends in pollinator forage quality over the last 30 years. … Continue reading

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Management of honey bee colonies may contribute to Varroa populations, study shows

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg Close proximity of honey bee colonies may contribute to Varroa population growth and virus transmission, according to an article recently published in Environmental Entomology. Varroa just detach from their current host and hitch … Continue reading

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Bayer announces 58 “Feed A Bee” projects

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg Bayer has  announced 58 projects that will receive funding to establish forage for pollinators across the nation. Nearly 100 projects were submitted in response to the request for proposals for the first … Continue reading

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Hot Cities Spell Bad News for Bees

 From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg by Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University A new study from North Carolina State University finds that common wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase. “We looked at 15 of the most … Continue reading

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European study shows various results with neonic-honey bee interactions

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg A study in Europe that tested bee health in neonicotinoid treated fields had different results in two countries, supporting previous statements that bee declines are the result of multiple factors. The study, … Continue reading

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Hot Cities Spell Bad News for Bees

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg by Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University A new study from North Carolina State University finds that common wild bee species decline as urban temperatures increase. “We looked at 15 of the most … Continue reading

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Why Does Bee Health Matter? The Science Surrounding Honey Bee Health Concerns and What We Can Do About It

June 19, 2017…Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST), Ames, Iowa. A colony of healthy honey bees is like a superorganism–individual bees provide the cohesiveness and interplay among its cells and tissues by delivering pollen and nectar containing nutrients necessary … Continue reading

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How can we save the pollinators?

Louise I. Lynch and Doug Golick, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Original article with photos at http://oxford.ly/2tsBiw1 An often-cited estimate is that one-third of the food you eat comes from insect pollinators. Many of the fruits and vegetables that … Continue reading

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New Resources Released for National Pollinator Week

From IPM in the South By Rosemary Hallberg From Growing Produce How can growers help bees and ensure they get reliable pollination for their crops? That question is being addressed by the Integrated Crop Pollination Project, which is celebrating National Pollinator … Continue reading

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