USDA announces new GroupGAP Program for produce industry

Helping Smaller Producers Reach New Markets

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) today announced the official launch of GroupGAP, a new certification program that helps small and mid-sized growers and cooperatives meet retailers’ on-farm food safety requirements.

“We know that GAP certification can sometimes be cost-prohibitive for smaller farmers,” said AMS Administrator Elanor Starmer. “GroupGAP allows these farmers to demonstrate compliance with strong food safety standards and share the cost of certification across a group of growers. That means greater market access for farmers, more options for consumers, and strong verification of food safety practices. It is a true win-win. We’re proud to have developed this innovative solution in partnership with our stakeholders.”

After a robust three-year pilot, AMS will today begin accepting applications for enrollment in GroupGAP, which certifies that grower groups are following industry-recognized food safety practices. By leveraging economies of scale and increasing efficiencies, GroupGAP improves market access for small and midsized farmers and benefits the entire produce industry.

The AMS Specialty Crops Inspection Division (SCI) performs Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) audits, which are voluntary audits to verify that farms are following industry-recognized food safety practices and recommendations from the Food and Drug Administration. Produce buyers, large and small, are increasingly requiring suppliers to be GAP certified. Under GroupGAP, farmers, food hubs, and cooperatives work together to obtain group certification. Their participation in the program in turn benefits retailers and other large-volume buyers, who are better able to meet the increasing demand for local foods and broaden their base of suppliers.

AMS GroupGAP audits include an analysis of the group’s system of oversight, a site visit to ensure compliance with various procedures, and spot checks to verify appropriate on-farm implementation. For more information or to submit an application, visit the GroupGAP website.. You can learn more about the AMS GAP Audit Program at this website.

GroupGAP is just one example of the many AMS programs and services that support strong local and regional food systems, as described at www.ams.usda.gov/services/local-regional. Across USDA, theĀ Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Initiative coordinates the Department’s policy, resources, and outreach efforts related to local and regional food systems. You can read more about the results of USDA investments in local food on the USDA website.

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