Category Archives: Weed Management

Absinth Wormwood – New Invasive Species in Nebraska Panhandle

Gary Stone – Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension & Kristi Paul – Sheridan County Weed Superintendent, Nebraska Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is a concept to identify potential invasive species prior to or just as the establishment of the invasive … Continue reading

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Report: Milkweed losses may not fully explain monarch butterfly declines

By  Diana Yates University of Illinois Steep declines in the number of monarch butterflies reaching their wintering grounds in Mexico are not fully explained by fewer milkweeds in the northern part of their range, researchers report in a new study. … Continue reading

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Status of Herbicide-Resistant Weeds in Nebraska

Amit Jhala – Extension Weed Management Specialist There are 480 unique cases of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes globally in 252 weed species (147 dicots and 105 monocots). Weeds have evolved resistance to 23 of 26 known herbicide sites of action and … Continue reading

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Get Your Green On! on April 3rd

Stay up to date on future MGG kickoff events by visiting our website at bit.ly/MGGkickoff

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What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

From IPM in the South by Rosemary Hallberg in Southeast Farm Press Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, … Continue reading

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Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems

Alexandra N. Kravchenko Sieglinde S. Snapp G. Philip Robertson http://www.pnas.org/content/114/5/926.abstract Significance Meeting future food needs requires a substantial increase in the yields obtained from existing cropland. Prior global analyses have suggested that these gains could come from closing yield gaps—differences … Continue reading

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Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

From IPM in the South by Rosemary Hallberg by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and … Continue reading

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New technology must be used with good stewardship

New technology must be used with good stewardship From IPM in the South by Rosemary Hallberg In Southwest Farm Press The old saw, “Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it,” attributed to George Santayana, should be made … Continue reading

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Comparing Generic Versus Name Brand Pesticides

Robert Klein – Nebraska Extension, Western Nebraska Crops Specialist Robert Tigner – Nebraska Extension,  Extension Educator (This article is part of Nebraska Extension’s Strengthening Nebraska’s Agricultural Economy series.) Over time, increasing numbers of generic pesticides have become available for use … Continue reading

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2017 Chart for Selection of Herbicides Based on Site of Action

Amit Jhala – Nebraska Extension Weed Management Specialist The 2017 Herbicide Classification chart detailing herbicide site- and modes-of-action was recently released. It was developed by the Take Action Against Herbicide-Resistant Weeds industry program. Six weeds, including common ragweed, marestail, giant … Continue reading

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